Home
Loading
  Contact Us    
Don't Let the Grinch Steal Thanksgiving

Why genuine gratitude begins with contentment.

by Greg Asimakoupoulos
November 25, 2004

Bookmark and Share


Don't Let the Grinch Steal Thanksgiving_Greg Asimakoupoulos-Why genuine gratitude begins with contentment In Whoville the Grinch was quite greedy and mean.
The envy within him caused him to turn green.
Ungrateful and jealous, this monster-like grouch
spent Thanksgiving morning curled up on the couch.
No holiday baking. No holiday fun.
The number of chairs at his table was one.

It seemed that his appetite wasn’t for food.
He always was stuck in the stuff-buying mood.
“Why cook up a turkey?” He said to himself.
“I’d rather add stuff to what’s stuffed on my shelf.”

The stores were all closed for the Great Day of Thanks.
But that was no problem. The green prince of pranks
could shop by computer to his heart’s content.
And clicking his mouse, the Grinch spent and he spent.

The Great Day of Thanking went by really quick
and by spending and buying the Grinch got real sick.
But nobody knew it. And nobody cared.
For Grinches are selfish and Grinches don’t share.
And if you are wondering the point of this rhyme,
then keep reading on past the end of this line.

In the -ville we inhabit there isn’t a Grinch.
But sometimes we act just like him cause we’re rich.
We buy what we want without batting an eye.
We silence our kids’ “gotta-haves” when they cry.
We love to go shopping and spend major cash
while throwing away what’s still good with the trash.

We envy our neighbor’s new car and new boat
and find ourselves lusting to have her mink coat.
We want a new kitchen. New drapes would be fine.
And oh don’t we love how our hardwood floors shine?

We long for the latest. We crave what is new.
We’re not satisfied having one. We need two.
Two big screen TV sets. Two Lexus. Two homes.
There’s two spouses working to service the loans.

And though when we’re cut we bleed red not Grinch-green,
our selfish Grinch tendencies still can be seen.
Our hearts are thing-centered. They aren’t good at thanks.
They start to beat stronger at Best Buy and banks.

It’s hard to be grateful when there’s more to buy.
We can’t track our assets. In truth, we don’t try.
Instead we’re inclined to add up what we need.
First this and then that and then… Look at our greed!

And even on this day when turkey is king
we aren’t satisfied with a leg and a wing.
We need mashed potatoes. We need candied yams.
We need beans and biscuits plus two kinds of jams.
There’s tossed greens and Jell-o and cranberries too.
At least we are grateful we know how to chew.

But gratitude’s not way high up on our list.
We feel so entitled it tends to get missed.
But that is not all we ungrateful folk do.
There’s something that turns us a Grinch-greenish hue.
We rarely if ever say “I’m satisfied.”
And if we did say it, we most likely we lied.

If we are forever fixated on more,
we can’t be contented. Contentment’s a chore.
Contentment is foreign. Contentment ain’t fun.
And why should we settle when our dreams aren’t done?

Why settle indeed? Because deep in our soul
we feel something’s missing. It feels like a hole.
It’s really a hunger that’s long been ignored
by Grinch-like behavior that’s caused us to hoard.

But, hey, it’s Thanksgiving. The hungry are filled.
Let thirsts, dreams and longings be quenched met & stilled.
No turkey is needed. A ham will not do.
The feelings you long for hide deep within you.

Start counting your blessings. Look back, not ahead.
Be done being selfish. Be grateful instead.
Be grateful for fingers, for eyelids that close.
Be grateful that you can still smell with your nose.
Be grateful for legs that allow you to walk.
Give thanks that the tongue in your mouth lets you talk.

Give thanks for your children. Give thanks for your spouse.
Give thanks for your over-stuffed “imperfect” house.
Be done with Grinch yearnings. Let thanks fill your heart.
Acknowledge God’s goodness. That’s where it will start.

Comments (1)


Post a Comment

Peggy Hoover from Lafayette IN writes:
November 19, 2008
Just heard this tonight at a Board Meeting for the local homeless and other local programs in need. It gives us all lots to ponder on and truly says a lot!! WONDERFUL! Thank you.

Send Us Your Opinion
(Comments are moderated.)
Your Name:*


Your E-Mail Address:*
(Confidential. Will not be published.)


Location:


Comments:*
Note: In order to control automated spam submissions, URLs are no longer permitted in this form.



Verification:
Please type the letters you see above.

  Printer-Friendly

Bookmark and Share


PO BOOKS BY GREG ASIMAKOUPOULOS
Sunday Rhymes & Reasons
Published June 4, 2009

Sunday Rhymes and Reasons is a compilation of inspirational poetry by America's pastor/poet laureate, Greg Asimakoupoulos. In this, his third volume of poetry, Pastor Greg paints word pictures that portray both the struggle and fulfillment that define a life of faith. His repertoire of rhymes celebrate rite-of-passage occasions like birth, baptism, marriage and death as well as the major holidays of the church and culture. It is a volume that illustrates the poet's love of words and of popular culture. The author dips his brush into a paint box of hubris, humor and honesty.

"Gloria and I have been encouraged by word pictures from Greg's pen that have celebrated both our ministry and God's presence in our world."Bill Gaither, Gospel music composer/performer

"Gifted poet Greg Asimakoupoulos is a dear friend of our family. His poetry blesses, comforts, entertains, and provides inspiration for every season of life."Natalie Grant, singer/songwriter/recording artist

More Information
RSS FEED
RSS Feed for Greg Asimakoupoulos: RSS Feed for Greg Asimakoupoulos
EMAIL ALERTS
Sign up to receive an e-mail notice when new articles by this author are published. Your address remains confidential, and you may cancel at any time. A confirmation email will be sent.

Your e-mail address:
Don't Let the Grinch Steal Thanksgiving
po Books
Now Available!

Teachings of a Three Year Old... Turned Tyke,
by Hal Evan Caplan.

A father learns from the wisdom of his toddler.

More Information.

More by Greg Asimakoupoulos
A Sermon in a Cherry Tree
The arrival of Spring trumpets the truth of Easter
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 3/24/17
The Best is Yet to Be
Thanking God for technology
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 3/17/17
The Lord is My Musher
Lessons of faith from the perspective of a sled dog
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 3/10/17
La La Land is More Than a Movie
Hollywood seduces young dreamers with nightmares
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 3/2/17
Let's Seize the Day
A reaction to death's too frequent surprise visits
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 2/24/17
Valentine's is More Than a Day
It's a way of life
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 2/17/17
The Great Brain Robbery
Reflecting on Tom Brady's missing jersey and my mom's stolen memories
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 2/10/17
» Complete List (783)


RSS FEED
RSS Feed for Greg Asimakoupoulos: RSS Feed for Greg Asimakoupoulos

Recently Published
View Article A Sermon in a Cherry Tree
The arrival of Spring trumpets the truth of Easter
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 3/24/17
The Best is Yet to Be
Thanking God for technology
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 3/17/17
The Lord is My Musher
Lessons of faith from the perspective of a sled dog
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 3/10/17
La La Land is More Than a Movie
Hollywood seduces young dreamers with nightmares
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 3/2/17
Let's Seize the Day
A reaction to death's too frequent surprise visits
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 2/24/17
Valentine's is More Than a Day
It's a way of life
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 2/17/17
The Great Brain Robbery
Reflecting on Tom Brady's missing jersey and my mom's stolen memories
by Greg Asimakoupoulos, 2/10/17

Get the Partial Observer's
'recently published' headlines via RSS.


RSS Feed for Recently Published PO Articles    What is RSS?

Reproduction of original material from The Partial Observer without written permission is strictly prohibited.
The opinions expressed by site contributors do not necessarily reflect those of the editors.
Copyright ©2000-2017 partialobserver.com. All rights reserved.
Home · Site Map · Top